Google Snaps Photo Editing Web Site

March has seen Google quietly move forward in its quest to control the world (or at least the Internet) as it acquired the image editing Web site Picnik. This is actually not too surprising considering Google's dedication to productive Web applications.

Picnik allows users to modify photos and other images online without requiring the installation of software like Photoshop. There is a free and a premium version of Picnik, giving those who use the service more often and require more features to have more tools available with the purchase of a monthly subscription fee. Google is already in the image business with its Picasa photo sharing Web site and desktop application. People use this mostly to store and transmit photographs and create personalized slide shows. Picasa users can connect to third party services to purchase prints, post cards, and other services. With Picnik under its umbrella, it's easy to see that Google's image processing capabilities will be greatly enhanced.

Not much in the way of details about Google's deal for Picnik are known yet. Some analysts expected that Yahoo! Would be after Picnik since the service is already integrated into its Yahoo! Mail service. Seeing that Picnik is easily integrated into mail services, it's reasonable to expect the new acquisition to find its way into Gmail, although it's unclear what form that service will take.

Although a combination of Picasa and Picnik would seem like a likely outcome of Google's recent move, no one is clear as to what to …

Photographic Resource Websites for Freelance Writers

A picture is worth a thousand words – or at least it's worth including in an article.

No matter how well written an article is the addition of a few snappy visuals will not only enhance it, but even get some people to take a look who might have passed it right on by. The trouble is finding the right visual assist. Where do you get these visuals? Film or televison articles can be easy – movie posters or stills from a production usually do just fine.

Snapping a few digital photos on your own is always a great way to go, but that can't always deliver for your project if it's way beyond your physical location or timeframe. You may be doing an overview of America's entrance into World War II or the launch of the first satellite into orbit. Your photographic skills are polished, but they're not magical. What next? Call in Harry Potter for help? Maybe, if you can't get him, or enter free or public domain photo websites.

Here are a few I use. They usually have what I need to dress up an article.

MorgueFile

Hands down one of the very best photographic websites around. The search engine is easy and it offers lots of selection. This is one stop shopping for me many times. You'll find it all and if they don't have it, you don't need it. But seriously, it's an amazing resource for all your photographic needs. I recommend it highly.

http://www.morguefile.com/…